Document Type

Data

Department/Program

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Publication Date

4-2018

Abstract

This research uses an estuarine-watershed hydrodynamic–biogeochemical modeling system along with projected mid-21st-century changes in temperature, freshwater flow, and sea level rise to explore the impact climate change may have on future Chesapeake Bay dissolved-oxygen (DO) concentrations and the potential success of nutrient reductions in attaining mandated estuarine water quality improvements.

Description

Model output contained here (all in netCDF format) includes the ChesROMS-ECB output files used to generate the figures and results shown in Irby et al., Biogeosciences, 2018. Please see journal article for details.

Files are included inside the following folders, all of which are located in:

Folder

Experiment name

out_std

Base+noCC

out_sce

TMDL+noCC

out_sce_river

TMDL+riverCC

out_sce_temp

TMDL+tempCC

out_sce_slr

TMDL+slrCC

out_sce_all

TMDL+allCC

out_std_all

Base+allCC

DOI

https://doi.org/10.21220/V5G74N

Keywords

Hypoxia, dead zone, low oxygen, global warming, Chesapeake Bay, TMDL, biogeochemical model

Publication Statement

Marjorie A. M. Friedrichs ORCID ID: 0000-0003-2828-7595 Issac D. Irby ORCID ID: 0000-0003-2968-4787

Funding

This paper is the result of research funded in part by NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science under award NA16NOS4780207 to the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) and by NOAA’s US Integrated Ocean Observing System Program Office as a subcontract to VIMS under award NA13NOS0120139 to the Southeastern University Research Association. Funding for early stages of model development was also provided by the NASA Interdisciplinary Science program (grant no. NNX14AF93G). This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number ACI-1548562 as well as computing facilities at the College of William and Mary, which were provided by contributions from the National Science Foundation, the Commonwealth of Virginia Equipment Trust Fund, and the Office of Naval Research.

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