Document Type

Report

Department/Program

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Publication Date

8-2001

Abstract

The hydrogeomorphic (HGM) approach applies functional indices to the assessment of functions by comparing functions across a suite of reference sites that range from severely altered to unaltered. This Draft Regional Guidebook is the result of applying the HGM approach to Hardwood Mineral Flats in the coastal plain of Virginia. In developing the Draft Regional Guidebook, various models from Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina, as well as, input from a workshop held in Wakefield, Virginia on May 13-14, 1998 were used to provide a template for model development. The workshop was attended by hydrologists, biogeochemists, soil scientists, wildlife biologists, and botanists from the public, private and academic sectors who have extensive knowledge of Hardwood Mineral Flats (Table 1 ). This Draft Regional Guidebook incorporates material from the "Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to Wet Pine Flats on Mineral Soils in the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains" by Richard Rheinhardt, Martha Rheinhardt, and Mark Brinson (1999). Excerpted material includes the overview of the HGM approach and the hydrology section (since the approach utilized for pine flats is also appropriate for hardwood flats). Additional input was gained from the "Draft Functional Assessment for Deciduous Mineral Flat Wetlands, Version 5 - 1999" by the Natural Resources Conservation Service staff. Valuable suggestions from end-users of other HGM guidebooks regarding the pros and cons of various sampling methods were considered and incorporated into this draft guidebook where possible. An attempt was made to incorporate data that is routinely collected as part of wetlands delineations to reduce duplication of field data and expedite the assessment procedure. The field sampling time for this assessment will depend on the size of the site, and the skill level and number of personnel. The sampling assessment protocol can be conducted by one person (though sampling of microtopography will require the use of a measured stake that can be installed temporarily in the ground). Two people can collect field data on a three- plot site in three to four hours.

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.21220/m2-5fvw-zs34

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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