ORCID ID

https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3998-0950

Date Awarded

2020

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Department

Education

Advisor

Megan X Tschannen-Moran

Committee Member

Tom J Ward

Committee Member

James H Stronge

Abstract

Using a combination of the quantitative and qualitative, a peer tutoring program at a secondary governor's school was analyzed between fall of 2015 to spring of 2019 for efficacy with respect to how participation influenced changes in tutees' quarter scores, when the optimal time to offer peer tutoring would be, and what participants identified as the primary benefits and barriers to attending. Peer tutoring was offered both after school and during lunch during this investigation, and yielded many interesting results. First, peer tutoring was found to have no significant influence overall upon change upon participants' quarter scores compared to a control, and in a highly unusual result was even found to have a negative influence upon tutees' quarter scores under certain circumstances. Second, participants attended during certain times and days more reliably than others, though overall attendance was highly vulnerable to academic and activity conflicts. Third, tutors' motivation to offer support tended to be altruistic in nature, whereas tutees' motivation was to receive academic support. Last, participants identified activity conflicts as a significant barrier to attending peer tutoring, and mixed results were found about the influence of lacking transportation as a challenge for attendance.

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.25774/w4-ztch-aq76

Rights

© The Author

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