ORCID ID

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8858-3954

Date Awarded

2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.Sc.)

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Danielle H Dallaire

Committee Member

Todd M Thrash

Committee Member

Catherine A Forestell

Abstract

Research has found that children with an incarcerated parent are at greater risk for externalizing behaviors (e.g., Kjellstrand & Eddy, 2011), which are associated with a plethora of developmental consequences including poorer family function (Donenberg & Baker, 1992), less academic achievement (Breslau et al., 2010), and later delinquency (Fergusson & Horwood, 1995). The present study modeled externalizing behaviors for individuals with and without incarcerated fathers. Utilizing latent growth curve analysis (LGCA) models and data from a large, multisite study, we modeled mother-reported problem behaviors from ages 54 months to 15 years. As predicted, on average, externalizing behaviors decreased over time. Initial externalizing behavior levels were associated with behavioral trajectories; individuals with higher scores at 54 months saw faster decreases over time. We found sex differences in externalizing behaviors with mothers reporting fewer behaviors at 54 months for females compared with males. We found that paternal incarceration at either 54 months or in 3rd grade was associated with greater initial levels externalizing behaviors. We also found that paternal incarceration at 54 months, but not in 3rd grade, was associated with externalizing behaviors occurring at the same time.

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.21220/s2-akg1-f242

Rights

© The Author

Available for download on Sunday, August 14, 2022

Included in

Psychology Commons

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