Document Type

Report

Department/Program

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Publication Date

1981

Series

Special scientific report No. 109

Abstract

In the event radionuclides are accidentally introduced into an estuary, many isotopes would become adsorbed on suspended particles of clay or silt; others would be incorporated into living cellular material (Caritt and Goodgal, 1954; Rice and Willis, 1959). Oysters and other filter feeders in these estuaries are capable of filtering from suspension large quantities of the suspended solids, as well as the larger living cellular material (Haven and Morales-Alamo, 1966a). Ingested material along with the associated radionuclides would be voided as compacted fecal strings or pellets (biodeposits). Many of these fecal pellets may be alternately suspended in the water mass or deposited on the bottom during a single tidal cycle (Haven and Morales-Alamo, 1968).

The present paper investigates how particles in the sand or clay size range, along with adsorbed radionuclides, may be mixed into subsurface deposits.

Description

From "Concentration of suspended radioactive wastes into bottom deposits," final report to the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission, Contract no. AT-(40-1)-2789 for the period 1 January 1961 to 31 December 1967

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.21220/m2-n7yq-6p66

Keywords

Radioisotopes in oceanography; Benthos -- Virginia -- York River; Estuarine sediments -- Virginia -- York River; Coastal sediments; Estuarine oceanography; Aquatic biology

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