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Document Type

Book Chapter

Department/Program

English

Publication Date

Summer 7-2010

Book Title

The Cambridge Companion to Virginia Woolf

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

Editor

Sue Roe and Susan Sellers

City

Cambridge, UK

Edition

2

First Page

29

Last Page

49

Abstract

On 26 July 1922, shortly after she finished writing her third novel, Jacob's Room, Virginia Woolf noted in her diary her feeling that, in writing this novel, she had 'found out how to begin (at 40) to say something in [her] own voice' (D2, p. 186). Critics have often followed Woolf's lead in regarding Jacob's Room as a starting-point of some kind. Many monographs on Woolf discuss the novels that preceded Jacob's Room (The Voyage Out (1915) and Night and Day (1919)) only in passing, or not at all, and where they are given more sustained attention they are often dismissed as 'apprentice efforts'. I Woolf's comments appear to authorise developmental reading of her oeuvre, readings which assume that her early novel were attempts to work out who she was as a novelist before, in early middle age, she found her characteristic fictional voice.

ISBN

9781139002875

Virginia Woolf's early novels: Finding a voice

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