Document Type

Article

Department/Program

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Publication Date

5-25-2019

Journal

Nature Climate Change

Volume

9

First Page

450

Last Page

457

Abstract

Ghost forests created by the submergence of low-lying land are one of the most striking indicators of climate change along the Atlantic coast of North America. Although dead trees at the margin of estuaries were described as early as 1910, recent research has led to new recognition that the submergence of terrestrial land is geographically widespread, ecologically and economically important, and globally relevant to the survival of coastal wetlands in the face of rapid sea level rise. This emerging understanding has in turn generated widespread interest in the physical and ecological mechanisms influencing the extent and pace of upland to wetland conversion. Choices between defending the coast from sea level rise and facilitating ecosystem transgression will play a fundamental role in determining the fate and function of low-lying coastal land.

DOI

10.1038/s41558-019-0488-7

Keywords

Climate change, restoration ecology

Publication Statement

This is the accepted manuscript version.

Available for download on Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Share

COinS