Document Type

Article

Department/Program

Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Publication Date

2019

Journal

Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans

Abstract

The carbonate chemistry in the Dalton Polynya in East Antarctica (115°–123°E) was investigated in summer 2014/2015 using high‐frequency underway measurements of CO2 fugacity (fCO2) and discrete water column measurements of total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) and total alkalinity. Air‐sea CO2 fluxes indicate this region was a weak net source of CO2 to the atmosphere (0.7 ± 0.9 mmol C m−2 day−1) during the period of observation, with the largest degree of surface water supersaturation (ΔfCO2 = +45 μatm) in ice‐covered waters near the Totten Ice Shelf (TIS) as compared to the ice‐free surface waters in the Dalton Polynya. The seasonal depletion of mixed‐layer TCO2 (6 to 51 μmol/kg) in ice‐free regions was primarily driven by sea ice melt and biological CO2 uptake. Estimates of net community production (NCP) reveal net autotrophy in the ice‐free Dalton Polynya (NCP = 5–20 mmol C m−2 day−1) and weakly heterotrophic waters near the ice‐covered TIS (NCP = −4–0 mmol C m−2 day−1). Satellite‐derived estimates of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and sea ice coverage suggest that the early summer season in 2014/2015 was anomalous relative to the long‐term (1997–2017) record, with lower surface Chl a concentrations and a greater degree of sea ice cover during the period of observation; the implications for seasonal primary production and air‐sea CO2 exchange are discussed. This study highlights the importance of both physical and biological processes in controlling air‐sea CO2 fluxes and the significant interannual variability of the CO2 system in Antarctic coastal regions.

DOI

10.1029/2018JC014882

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Oceanography Commons

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